Look out, Mr Cameron, or we’ll all be in the dark


Editor:
This is a good piece, a story that has been told over and over. An important story that most will never see.
The govt. and the media keep playing the global warming game, in order to tax the hell out of the
citizenry. All brought to by the UN via Agenda 21.

By Christopher Booker

Last Updated: 12:01am BST 29/06/2008

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Since
Gordon Brown on Thursday launched what he called “the greatest
revolution in our energy policy since the advent of nuclear power”,
centred on building thousands of new wind turbines, let us start with a
simple fact.

Nothing conveys the futility of
wind power more vividly than this: that all the electricity generated
by the 2,000 wind turbines already built in Britain is still less than
that produced by a single medium-sized conventional power station.

There
are nearly 50 nuclear, gas or coal-fired power plants in Britain today
each of which produces more electricity in a year than all those 2,000
turbines put together.

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I
make no apology for returning to this subject because the “£100 billion
green energy strategy” published last week, by what is now laughably
known as the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform
(BERR), contains not only many smaller deceptions and self-deceptions
but one so great that almost everyone has fallen for it.

The
starting point is the EU’s requirement that, to combat the “threat of
climate change”, we must drastically reduce our CO2 emissions, chiefly
by building thousands more wind turbines.

It is
quite clear from the paper that BERR’s officials know we haven’t the
faintest hope of meeting our EU target in this way. So its
number-crunchers have been working overtime to squeeze down the amount
of energy we source from wind to the lowest figure it thinks can be
made to sound plausible.

Until last week BERR had
been claiming that our EU requirement meant that we must generate 38
per cent of our electricity from renewables, the largest contribution
coming from 11,000 offshore turbines, representing 33 gigawatts (GW) of
capacity. But all this has changed dramatically.

They now talk only about the need to meet 32 per cent of our total EU
renewables target through our methods of electricity generation, with
only 32 per cent of that needing to come from wind – and that, they
say, can be done with a mere 7,000 new offshore and onshore turbines.

However,
our present generating capacity is 76GW. By 2020, on projected demand,
to replace one third of one third of our capacity with wind power would
mean generating an average of 10GW.

And herein
lies the central misconception which bedevils the entire debate.
Because of the wind’s intermittency, turbines generate on average at
less than a third of their capacity. Thus to contribute 10GW would need
30GW of capacity, which would require up to twice as many turbines as
ministers are talking about – needing to be erected at a rate of more
than four every working day between now and 2020.

  • Read more from Christopher Booker
  • In
    practical terms, even if they grossly bend the planning rules (as MPs
    voted for last week), there isn’t the remotest chance that anything
    like this number of turbines could be built in time to meet their
    target.

    For instance, the world only has five of
    the giant barges that can install monster turbines offshore – and for
    more than half the year our weather conditions make installation
    impossible anyway.

    But in addition we should also
    need to build at least 20 new conventional power stations simply to
    provide back-up for all the times when the wind is not blowing – at a
    time when, within seven years, we already stand to lose 40 per cent of
    our existing generating capacity through the closure of almost all our
    ageing nuclear power plants and half our major coal and oil-fired power
    stations (due to the crippling cost of complying with an EU
    anti-pollution directive).

    It is a total mess. The
    reality is that, thanks to the dithering and wishful thinking of our
    politicians, it may already be too late to avert that breakdown of our
    electricity supply which would be one of the most serious disasters
    Britain has ever faced.

    And, ironically, no one
    at present looks more likely to inherit this mess than David Cameron –
    whose only response to last week’ s pie-in-the-sky from Gordon Brown
    was to say that the Government should have been building all those
    useless windmills years ago.

    Warming denial a ‘high crime’ says Nasa chief

    James
    Hansen, the head of Nasa’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS),
    is to ask Congress for the chief executives of US energy companies to
    face trial for the “high crime” of denying global warming.

    Since
    his historic speech to Congress in July 1988, Mr Hansen and his close
    ally Al Gore have done more than anyone else to promote the warming
    scare which has since swept the world. Yet this is the man who last
    summer was forced to correct erroneous temperature figures on his
    influential GISS website, to show that the highest recorded US surface
    temperatures were not in the last 10 years, as Hansen claimed, but in
    the 1930s.

    His latest outburst is only one of many
    recent signs of desperation in the warmist lobby, as falling global
    temperatures threaten to undermine the central tenet of their
    orthodoxy.

    Far from continuing to rise in sync
    with CO2 levels, as the theory says they should, temperatures have not
    only been dropping but are now lower than when Hansen and Gore set the
    scare in train in 1988. (For latest graph see the Watts Up With That website.)

    Even fanatical upholders of the dogma are having to admit that warming
    seems “temporarily” to have stopped (along with the sunspot activity
    they try to ignore), although they weakly claim, on no plausible
    evidence, that in 10 years’ time it will somehow return worse than ever.

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