When Electricity Made Sense

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Premier, Dalton McGuinty Talks About Renewable Energy For Ontario


Energy Policy ‘Too Wind Focused’

Editor:  The UK is calling for more coal and nuclear.

But here in Ontario,  Dalton McGuinty and George Smitherman just keep on jambing up the wind farms even though anyone with an ounce of sense  should know better.

Listen up Dalton and George, it’s over, everyone but you two seen to get the picture.

Quit wasting the taxpayers money!  CO2 doesn’t cause global warming.

Get your act together or resign!


The UK must invest more in nuclear and clean coal energy and put less emphasis on wind power if it wants a secure low-carbon future, business leaders say.

The CBI says government energy policy is “disjointed” and it is urging a “more balanced” energy mix.

The current approach means the UK might miss climate change targets, it added.

The government said putting in place a balanced mix of renewables, new nuclear and cleaner fossil fuels was at the heart of its energy policy.

But the CBI is calling for more action.

“The government’s disjointed approach is deterring the private sector investment needed to get our energy system up to scratch, bolster security and cut emissions,” said CBI deputy director general John Cridland.

“While we have generous subsidies for wind power, we urgently need the national planning statements needed to build new nuclear plants.

“If we carry on like this we will end up putting too many of our energy eggs in one basket.”

Full story at the BBC

Premier, Dalton McGuinty Talks About Renewable Energy For Ontario

Ontario becomes a Fascist State

More growers turn to coal – Use of Coal is Expanding in the Province of Ontario

Beware! The Green Shirts Are Here

Doctor calls for health study

Doctor calls for health studies on windmill farms


When London surgeon Robert McMurtry decided to build a house, he wanted to go green — geothermal heating, solar panels for hot water and a wind turbine for electricity.

But when he started reading about wind turbines, the former dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario said he had a change of heart.

“I thought, ‘Holy Toledo, there are some issues here.’ ”

Dozens of wind turbines have already been built or proposed in Southwestern Ontario, as Queen’s Park tries to wean Ontario off dirty coal-fired electricity plants and reduce its reliance on nuclear power.

McMurtry is calling for health studies into the wind turbine farms popping up across Ontario with backing by the provincial government. With towers nearly 100 metres tall, and blades half that long, the turbines can be an imposing sight, even from afar.

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“At minimum, they should be doing a survey of people around wind farms and getting a sense of how many people are complaining of problems,” he said.

“If there is enough evidence, they should mount a formal epidemiological study,” McMurtry said.

In the U.S. and Western Europe especially, where wind farms are more advanced than in Canada, complaints abound about the low-frequency sound the giant windmills generate.

In Canada, Ontario is one of the only provinces with any regulations governing wind farms, requiring a noise-impact assessment for areas up to 1,000 metres from the wind turbine.

McMurtry is concerned about the health complaints he’s heard from people living near wind farms, including sleep disturbance from the noise of the giant turbine blades.

“Once you have sleep disturbance for a few days, you aren’t going to be feeling well,” he said.

Last week, the province announced it’s backing six new wind farm projects, including three in Chatham-Kent, that are expected to create 558 jobs.

Total investment in the new farms is expected to reach $1.32 billion.

McMurtry, who has taken his concerns to Ontario Energy Minister George Smitherman, said it’s going to be an uphill battle to convince people to look hard at the health implications because turbines have become closely associated with green energy.

“It has got an iconic, symbolic status that really carries a lot of weight and there is a very powerful, worldwide lobby group behind it,” he said.

McMurtry said turbines smaller than the ones being installed may be better than the monsters now going up.

“Harness the wind safely. Let’s look at other alternatives. There are better, smarter options,” he added.

Monica Elmes, of the Chatham-Kent Wind Action Group, an organization opposed to the wind farms, said the turbines will be an unreliable, intermittent source of electricity and a waste of taxpayers’ money.

“All Ontario residents are truly the losers in this scam,” Elmes said in an e-mail.

For the latest local coverage, read The London Free Press on the web or in print.

Video of the Ripley wind farm

Canadian Space Agency Watches Wind Turbine Explode

I don’t know why, but I find this rather amusing. I get a lot of visits from different govt. agencies but the thought of the Canadian Space Agency sitting around watching a wind turbine explode, cracks me up.

The CBC, both Toronto and Montreal were on my blog today, maybe they could get together with the Space Agency and make a short documentary on the subject.

IP Address         142.74.1.# (Canadian Space Agency)
ISP         Canadian Space Agency
Continent     :     North America
Country     :     Canada  (Facts)
State/Region     :     Ontario
City     :     Ottawa
Lat/Long     :     45.4167, -75.7 (Map)
Distance     :     476 miles

Visit Entry Page http://windfarms.wor…-turbine-in-denmark/


Ever wondered why you can’t get anyone in govt. to listen when confronted about the negative affects of wind farms?  T

hey don’t give a damn  about you, your family or your property value. They smell money.

This is the Enron Scam on steroids. Ex-politicians filling their pockets with your tax dollars.

What do you get in return? Higher electrical costs, higher taxes, and if you are unlucky enough to live near a wind farm, a life altering experience.

Sunday, April 06, 2008

‘Unrelated’ ICBC resignation unbelievable


Michael Smyth
The Province

Trying to figure out Paul Taylor’s “coincidental” resignation as boss of ICBC is sort of like kicking the tires on one of their chop-shop write-offs — or attending one of the insurance monopoly’s rigged auctions.

There’s a lot more going on here than meets the eye of the average sucker.

{Snip} …

But if you still think Taylor’s departure is “completely unrelated” to ICBC’s little chop shop of horrors out in Burnaby — well, I know an ICBC insider who can get you a heckuva deal on a rebuilt Yugo (as long as you’re not picky about things like working air bags).

Completely unrelated? Give me a freaking break. The public has been ripped off. ICBC insiders have benefitted from a shabby scheme usually reserved for grifters and sharpies.

Most disturbing of all is the possibility illegally rebuilt vehicles have been hustled to unsuspecting B.C. drivers without the proper safety checks.

There’s more than a monopoly’s corporate reputation on the line here. People’s lives were possibly put at risk so ICBC insiders could line their own pockets.

And now the CEO is strapping on his parachute and hitting the silks during the crisis? Very impressive.

They can call it “completely unrelated” if they want. I call it an abdication of duty. Taylor should be promising the public that he’ll get to the bottom of this extremely disturbing scandal and take his lumps if he’s found ultimately responsible.

Instead, he’s running away. And his corporate and political masters have nothing but praise.

Source The Province

Mr. Taylor, President and CEO of the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC), will join NaiKun Wind Group as President and Director. Steven Eckert, a former consultant to BC Hydro

Ex-AECL boss’ firm could make Millions

Tory insider’s involvement in project ‘doesn’t pass the smell test’:

Ottawa Citizen Saturday, December 22, 2007
Michael Burns, the B.C. businessman and backroom Conservative who recently resigned as chairman of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., is also chairman of a Vancouver wind power firm the federal government approved for up to $10 million in alternate energy funding while Mr. Burns was AECL chairman. The offshore wind power company, NaiKun Wind Energy Group, has two former assistants to Prime Minister Stephen Harper as senior officers and also has other well-connected Conservatives on its board of directors. NaiKun received approval for wind.
Mr. Taylor, President and CEO of the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC), will join NaiKun Wind Group as President and Director. Steven Eckert, a former consultant to BC Hydro
Ventus Energy Inc. – The Toronto-based company, whose flagship wind projects are in PEI. . Former Ontario premier David Peterson is a board member of privately held Ventus.

If you know of any other Canadian ex-politicians involved in the energy scam please let me know.

Kyoto supporters have no idea

Happy to see Mr. Goldstein finally taking the gloves off. He should have been saying this a long time ago. Better late than never I guess.

The National Post has been telling it’s readers for quite some time that global warming is a fraud, and it is.

 The Toronto Star- enough said.

I would hope by now these papers would have some understanding of the wind energy situation. It is part of the global warming – Kyoto fraud. 

The govt. says it must put up wind farms to save the environment from global warming and to meet our Kyoto commitments. 

What they are doing, is running over the rights of the citizens of Ont. 

It’s ironic that the very people that say the windmills must be installed to save the environment, have no problem trashing the environment of the people already living there.

Global warming is a fraud as is Kyoto and the wind farms.

It’s time the papers got on board and starting stating the truth about wind farms. 


Lorrie Goldstein

Thu, April 3, 2008
Kyoto supporters have no idea
It’s time for an adult discussion about our continued participation in the Kyoto Accord and it’s not the one we’ve been having.

Our politicians have been talking to us as if we were children. It’s time we put a stop to it.

Kyoto isn’t about turning off the lights during Earth Hour.

It’s not about buying hybrid cars, or installing solar panels on your roof or replacing your incandescent lightbulbs with fluorescents.

Those are all environmentally worthy activities on their own merits.


But they are insignificant compared to what is required for Canada to comply with Kyoto.

This isn’t about David Suzuki making cutesy commercials with children, while calling for politicians he disagrees with to be jailed.

It’s not about Liberal Leader Stephane Dion’s empty boast we can make megatonnes of money by cutting megatonnes of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

It’s not about Prime Minister Stephen Harper paying lip service to Kyoto, while his actions suggest he doesn’t believe a word he’s saying.

It’s about this. Are you willing to dramatically lower your standard of living, and that of your children and grandchildren, to comply with Kyoto?

Are you willing to pay much more, directly in carbon taxes and indirectly for almost everything you do, use or consume, to effect a sudden, dramatic drop in Canada’s GHG emissions?


Are you willing to have Canada ship billions of dollars every year to the Third World for GHG mitigation projects, the success of which won’t be known until you’re dead?

Finally, if we do all that, do you trust every other country, from China to the United States, to do the same?

This isn’t about vilifying Alberta for developing the oilsands — just as every province wants to develop its natural resources.

It’s about realizing if we comply with Kyoto, our standard of living will fall.

It’s not going to be easy. People who suggest it is are making long-range predictions about our economy they cannot possibly know. What their studies actually suggest is that it’s easy to pretend to comply with Kyoto.

Finally, if you publicly nod your head in agreement when environmentalists preach we have no choice because the alternative is the Earth’s destruction — but privately don’t believe it, or don’t believe we should make enormous sacrifices now for something that may or may not happen decades or centuries from now — then get off the Kyoto train, because you won’t have the stomach for it once it really gets rolling.

My view is the previous Liberal government of Jean Chretien irresponsibly ratified Kyoto in 2002, at a time when even his top aide, Eddie Goldenberg, has since acknowledged the Liberals knew Canadians weren’t ready for the sacrifices it would require.


I’d go further. I’d argue Chretien and the Liberals had no idea what they were signing, no idea of its implications for a huge, cold, northern country like our own that relies on using fossil fuels for its standard of living.

For all their self-righteous rhetoric now, if implementing Kyoto was easy, why didn’t the Liberals do it when they had the chance?

As for Harper and the Conservatives, they should stop telling us they agree with Kyoto, while doing nothing to implement it.

The adult question is: Are we in, or are we out?

My vote’s out. What’s yours?

EU industry sees emissions rise

There are only two ways to lower C02 emissions. Build nuclear or shut down heavy industry.
I predict that both will happen. Because China and India are not subject to Kyoto and they have low labour costs, you will see heavy industry move to those countries. The EU will be forced to build nuclear or pay high carbon emission taxes. All the wind farms and solar panels in the world will not power heavy industry. You can wish and hope all you want but in the final analysis it takes ‘real power’ to run heavy industry.


EU industry sees emissions rise

By Mark Kinver
Science and nature reporter, BBC News


Power generation was the only sector to exceed its emissions limit

Carbon dioxide emissions from Europe’s heavy industry sectors rose by 1.1% in 2007, say carbon market analysts.

The estimate is based on initial data from the EU’s Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), which includes more than 10,000 large industrial plants.

Environmentalists say it shows that the scheme, the EU’s main mechanism to meet its Kyoto target, is not working.

But market watchers say the ETS, in the long term, will help deliver the EU goal of cutting emissions by 20%.

“The main thing we have seen from the data released today, although incomplete, is that emissions are up from 2006 to 2007 by about 1.1%,” explained Henrik Hasselknipp, senior analyst for Point Carbon, a research company.

He added that initial analysis of the data also showed that only a few countries’ emissions had exceeded their national limit.

Get the level of cap wrong and, as we saw in Phase One of the ETS, the carbon price could drop to very low, potentially unworkable, levels
Robert Casamento,
Ernst & Young

Most notable was the UK, he said, which went over its allocation by about 85m tonnes for the three-year period between 2005 and 2007.

He suggested that power generators in the UK, Italy and Spain were the only sectors that had exceeded their allowances.

From the BBC